SSRI antidepressants may increase the risk of fractures

SSRI antidepressants may increase the risk of fractures

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are a type of antidepressant drugs, used to reduce the menopause symptoms. However, according to a research, they can increase the risk of bone fractures. The researchers were able to gain access to the database, containing data from 61 million patients in 98 care plans in the United States. They found that the risk last several years, compared with women who took indigestion drugs. Women who took selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors had 76% higher fracture risk than women who didn’t use these drugs. This risk was one year after starting a treatment. After 2 years of the same treatment, the risk was 73% higher and after 5 years it was 67% higher. 

Researchers said that shorter treatment is probably better. In the United States, SSRIs are 3rd most prescribed drugs. They are frequently prescribed for nonpsychiatric disorders. They are also used instead HRT (hormone replacement therapy) for night sweats and how flashes. Both of these symptoms are linked to menopause. 

The researchers concentrated on 137.031 women. All of them were aged between 40 and 64 years and all of them had no mental issues. They started with SSRI treatments between 1998 and 2010. They were compared with 236.294 women (the same age group) who were treated with proton pump inhibitors or H2 antagonists.

Researchers found that SSRIs increase the risk of bone fracture. Also, shorter treatment is preferable. These drugs can change the bone turnover. Simply said, they affect negatively on the bone density, so they increase the risk of bone fractures. The best way to solve this potential problem is to avoid this treatment.